Plastic debris and fibers from textiles in fish and bivalves sold for human consumption

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The pie charts above show the percentage of each type (i.e. plastic fragments, fibers, plastic film, plastic foam and plastic monofilament) of anthropogenic debris found across all fish sampled from Indonesia (top) and the United States (bottom). Images show examples of each type of debris found. Scale bars on all pictures are set at 500 μm.

Click to enlarge. The pie charts above show the percentage of each type (i.e. plastic fragments, fibers, plastic film, plastic foam and plastic monofilament) of anthropogenic debris found across all fish sampled from Indonesia (top) and the United States (bottom). Images show examples of each type of debris found. Scale bars on all pictures are set at 500 μm.

“The ubiquity of anthropogenic marine debris and the toxicity of chemicals associated with the material have begun to raise concerns regarding how the ingestion of anthropogenic debris by marine animals may impact human health. These concerns have prompted a concerted effort from government and private organizations to assess the impacts of marine debris on human and environmental health, including organizations such as NCEAS (National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis), UNEP (United National Environment Programme), US EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency), GESAMP (Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection) and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). Almost every report from these groups concluded further research is required to elucidate how marine debris may be affecting humans, and thus, whether inadequate waste management strategies are coming back to haunt us in our seafood.”

Read entire report here.

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